Waiting On Wednesday – 76

Hello gentle reader,

today I’m waiting on REBEL OF THE SANDS by debut author Alwyn Hamilton (expected publication: February/March 2016 by Viking/Penguin (US) and Faber & Faber (UK)). It’s a YA Fantasy and the first in a planned series. I met Alwyn at the YALC in London this summer and I was lucky enough to read the first chapters of her book, which are awesome. I can’t wait to read the full story and to see this series become huge! And have you seen these gorgeous covers??


UK Cover


US Cover

From Goodreads:

She’s more gunpowder than girl—and the fate of the desert lies in her hands.

Mortals rule the desert nation of Miraji, but mystical beasts still roam the wild and barren wastes, and rumor has it that somewhere, djinni still practice their magic. But there’s nothing mystical or magical about Dustwalk, the dead-end town that Amani can’t wait to escape from.

Destined to wind up “wed or dead,” Amani’s counting on her sharpshooting skills to get her out of Dustwalk. When she meets Jin, a mysterious and devastatingly handsome foreigner, in a shooting contest, she figures he’s the perfect escape route. But in all her years spent dreaming of leaving home, she never imagined she’d gallop away on a mythical horse, fleeing the murderous Sultan’s army, with a fugitive who’s wanted for treason. And she’d never have predicted she’d fall in love with him…or that he’d help her unlock the powerful truth of who she really is.

“Waiting On Wednesday” is a weekly event, hosted by book blogger Breaking The Spine, that spotlights upcoming releases we’re eagerly anticipating.

Have you heard about this book? Is it on your TBR list? What are you waiting on this week?

Waiting On Wednesday – 75

Hello gentle reader,

today I’m waiting on REAWAKENED by Colleen Houck (expected publication: 11th August 2015 by Delacorte Press). It’s a YA Fantasy and the first in a planned series from the NYT bestselling author of the TIGER’S CURSE series. I’ve read good reviews for this book and I’m looking forward to reading it: it sounds like a fun summer read!


From Goodreads:

When seventeen-year-old Lilliana Young enters the Metropolitan Museum of Art one morning during spring break, the last thing she expects to find is a live Egyptian prince with godlike powers, who has been reawakened after a thousand years of mummification.

And she really can’t imagine being chosen to aid him in an epic quest that will lead them across the globe to find his brothers and complete a grand ceremony that will save mankind.

But fate has taken hold of Lily, and she, along with her sun prince, Amon, must travel to the Valley of the Kings, raise his brothers, and stop an evil, shape-shifting god named Seth from taking over the world.

From New York Times bestselling author Colleen Houck comes an epic adventure about two star-crossed teens who must battle mythical forces and ancient curses on a journey with more twists and turns than the Nile itself.

“Waiting On Wednesday” is a weekly event, hosted by book blogger Breaking The Spine, that spotlights upcoming releases we’re eagerly anticipating.

Have you heard about this book? Is it on your TBR list? What are you waiting on this week?

A Writer in the Spotlight – William Ritter

A Writer In The Spotlight Logo

Hello gentle reader,

today I’m delighted to share with you another interview with a YA author! Meet William Ritter, author of JACKABY and upcoming BEASTLY BONES.

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Author: William Ritter

Website: http://rwillritter.wordpress.com/

Twitter: @Willothewords


Reports of William Ritter’s birthplace are unreliable and varied, placing his hometown either in a series of mysterious Catacombs in Malta or in a nondescript town in Oregon. His parents, it can be confirmed, raised him to value intelligence, creativity, and individuality. When reading aloud, they always did the voices.

At the University of Oregon, William made questionable choices, including willfully selecting classes for the interesting stories they promised, rather than for any practical application. When he wasn’t frivolously playing with words, he earned credits in such meaningful courses as Trampoline, Juggling, and 17th Century Italian Longsword. These dubious decisions notwithstanding, he regrets nothing and now holds degrees in English and Education with certificates in Creative Writing and Folklore.

He currently teaches high school Language Arts, including reading and writing, mythology and heroes. He is a proud husband and father. When reading aloud, he always does the voices.

My interview (8th July 2015)


Did you always know you wanted to be a writer? When/How did you decide to be a writer?

I’ve loved writing stories as long as I can remember. I wrote little mini-books about superheroes in elementary school and drew comics for my middle-school newspaper. I wrote stories for fun and to entertain my wife and family, not because I ever thought anything would come of it. Jackaby sort of decided it wanted to be a proper novel without my planning it.

Are you a full-time writer? When and where do you write?

I am a teacher during the school year, so I write weekends and evenings, and of course during the summer. I have a nice little writing desk at home where I get a lot of work done, but I sometimes occupy a quiet corner of the library or a local bookstore when I need to really buckle down and concentrate.

What do you say to writers who want to be traditionally published one day?

Motivation is easy to lose, so when you want to write for profit, write for pleasure. Seriously. If you write by thinking rationally about what the market is looking for and how to maximize the appeal of your product based on industry data blah blah blah… then you will create for yourself a hard job that you hate. That’s not why you’re writing. You could become an accountant for that. Instead, design for yourself the kind of book you really want to read—have fun with it and fall in love with your own characters. That sort of passion carries into the prose AND it ensures that when you don’t get that big contract you were hoping for—or when you DO and it leads to even more hard work—you’re still enjoying yourself.


To write JACKABY, where did you get your inspiration from? 

Life—mine and other people’s. Fiction. Facts. The stuff in-between. Books. Classes I’ve taken and classes I’ve taught. My inspiration for writing tends to come from everything and everyone I’ve ever known. When that fails, I make stuff up.

Your book is pitched as Doctor Who meets Sherlock Holmes, were they really an inspiration for you?

Yes, in that I was inspired by all of the many stories and characters that I love, but otherwise no, not directly. The Doctor and Sherlock Holmes are very similar characters already, eccentric outsiders who lead their companions into wild adventures—an apt description for Jackaby as well—but I found my way to that archetype on my own, not because I was trying to play to any established fanbases or emulate any particular series. I designed Jackaby as an excuse to tell stories about folklore and mythology and gave him an lifestyle that allowed me to build those stories around madcap capers and magical mysteries.

Your book is a Historical Fantasy: how did you find the right balance between historical facts and the fantasy aspects of the story?

Toward the start, I eased into the fantastical elements gradually to give the narrator—and thereby the reader—time to adjust, but overall, it’s an easy balance. The fantasy in Jackaby is almost entirely taken from existing world folklore. I teach Mythology classes, and I always open by establishing clearly that we are not studying fiction and we are not studying facts. Myths are sacred narratives in their own category. That’s the same approach I take when I pick elements for my own stories. The research involved in finding interesting creatures or magical charms feels very much like the research involved in finding period accurate clothing or atmospheric architecture.


What are you working on now? 

I am in revision for the third book in the Jackaby series and already poking at my collected notes for book four. Every book has grown differently, so I feel as though I’m learning how to write all over again each time. It’s a lot of work, but also tremendous fun. I count myself extremely lucky to be given the chance to do what I do.

What are your favourite books? (Any books you’d recommend?)

So many. My standby favorite authors are PG Wodehouse, Neil Gaiman, and Terry Pratchett. If you’re looking for something in the historical fantasy genre, I can wholeheartedly recommend The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern, The Golem and the Jinni by Helen Wecker, Diviners by Libba Bray, and Ms. Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children by Ransom Riggs. All great reads.

Thank you for a great interview, William!

Thanks so much for having me on your Writer in the Spotlight segment—happy reading!

You can add Jackaby and Beastly Bones on Goodreads here.


Waiting On Wednesday – 74

Hello gentle reader,

today I’m waiting on LEGACY OF KINGS (Blood of Gods and Royals #1) by Eleanor Herman (expected publication: 25th August 2015 by Harlequin Teen). It’s a YA Historical Fantasy and a re-imagining of the life of Alexander the Great. Doesn’t it sound amazing?!

Legacy of Kings

From Goodreads:

Imagine a time when the gods turn a blind eye to the agony of men, when the last of the hellions roam the plains and evil stirs beyond the edges of the map. A time when cities burn, and in their ashes, empires rise.

Alexander, Macedonia’s sixteen-year-old heir, is on the brink of discovering his fated role in conquering the known world but finds himself drawn to newcomer Katerina, who must navigate the dark secrets of court life while hiding her own mission: kill the Queen. But Kat’s first love, Jacob, will go to unthinkable lengths to win her, even if it means competing for her heart with Hephaestion, a murderer sheltered by the prince. And far across the sea, Zofia, a Persian princess and Alexander’s unmet fiancée, wants to alter her destiny by seeking the famed and deadly Spirit Eaters.

Weaving fantasy with the salacious and fascinating details of real history, New York Times bestselling author Eleanor Herman reimagines the greatest emperor the world has ever known: Alexander the Great, in the first book of the Blood of Gods and Royals series.

“Waiting On Wednesday” is a weekly event, hosted by book blogger Breaking The Spine, that spotlights upcoming releases we’re eagerly anticipating.

Have you heard about this book? Is it on your TBR list? What are you waiting on this week?

A Writer in the Spotlight – Mackenzi Lee

A Writer In The Spotlight Logo

Hello gentle reader,

today I’m delighted to share with you another interview with a debut YA author! Meet Mackenzi Lee, author of THIS MONSTROUS THING (coming 22d September 2015 from Katherine Tegen Books, an imprint of HarperCollins).

Mackenzi Lee

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Author: Mackenzi Lee

Website: https://mackenzilee.wordpress.com/

Twitter:  @themackenzilee 


Mackenzi Lee is a reader, writer, bookseller, unapologetic fangirl, and fast talker. She holds an MFA from Simmons College in writing for children and young adults, and her short fiction for children and teens has appeared in Inaccurate Realities, The Friend, and The Newport Review.  Her young adult historical fantasy novel, THIS MONSTROUS THING, which won the PEN-New England Susan P. Bloom Children’s Book Discovery Award, as well as an Emerging Artist Grant from the St. Botolph Club Foundation, will be published on September 22, 2015 by Katherine Tegen Books, an imprint of HarperCollins. She loves Diet Coke, sweater weather, and Star Wars. On a perfect day, she can be found enjoying all three. She currently calls Boston home.

My interview (3d June 2015)

Did you always know you wanted to be a writer? When/How did you decide to be a writer?

Definitely not–when I was in high school I wanted to be an actress, I majored in history in college, and worked in children’s theater and public radio before I found my way to writing. When I was young, I wrote a lot, and in high school I wrote fanfiction and terrible poetry. But I never really thought about being a writer as a career until I was living in the UK and doing a lot of traveling. Since I spent a lot of time in airports and bus stations, I started reading for fun for the first time since I was in middle school. And it was so much fun that it reminded me how reading as a kid had inspired me to write. So I started writing, sort of for the first time and sort of again. So for the first time again.

Are you a full-time writer? When and where do you write?

I am not–I actually have two other jobs (lucky for me, both are book related). So I do a lot of writing late at night and on weekends and on my lunch breaks. I am lucky enough to be part of a community called the Writer’s Room of Boston, which gives me a space to write, so I do a lot of work from the sixth story of an old skyscraper near the harbor, looking out on a fire escape that is so picture perfect I want to climb out on it with my ukulele and sing Moon River. I also do a fair amount of writing in bed. Because tired.

What do you say to writers who want to be traditionally published one day?

The number one big thing is to remember that everyone’s path is different. There is no one right way to get published, or one path, and other people’s’ journey is no indication of what yours will be.

The second big thing is to remember that everything you write counts, even if it doesn’t get published. I have three or four or five practice novels I wrote before THIS MONSTROUS THING. I have a book that I signed with my agent with that was on sub for a year and never sold. It’s hard not to think of all the time I spent on these projects that will never do anything but sit on my hard drive as wasted time, but it’s not. I couldn’t have written TMT without writing them first. Writing is like playing an instrument–no one sits down at the piano and expects to be good right off the bat. You have to practice, and that practice isn’t wasted time.

And third, remember that it’s not a race. You don’t have an expiration date on you. You aren’t running out of time to get published. I know it feels that way–trust me, I know. And I know it feels like good things are happening to everyone but you. There will be days you will go on Twitter and feel like everyone has an agent and everyone has a book deal but you. But the good thing is, it’s not a race. There aren’t a finite number of books that can be published. You don’t get a countdown clock attached to you as soon as you start trying to be traditionally published. This thing takes time.


THIS MONSTROUS THING was inspired by Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, how did you come up with the idea for it?

My novels never have a single inception moment, so TMT came from a lot of places: seeing a production of Frankenstein at the National Theater in London that changed my perspective on the book, traveling to Germany and France at Christmas time, learning the story behind Mary Shelley writing Frankenstein. And, probably most importantly, a lifetime of being the volatile older half of a pair of siblings.

Do you listen to music when you write? If yes, what did you listen to when writing THIS MONSTROUS THING?

I do listen to music! A lot of TMT was written to the album The Life of the World To Come by the Mountain Goats, which is very biblical (each song has a corresponding scripture) and has lots of life and death and resurrection imagery, so it was very appropriate for a book based on a book based on the Bible. My favorite song from the album is Genesis 30:3 and Psalm 40:2 (which has the oh so appropriate line “Send me a mechanic if I’m not beyond repair”). Some other highlights from the TMT mixtape: Autoclave by The Mountain Goats, Mary by Noah and the Whale, Empty Rocking Chair by Parsonsfield, After the Bombs by the Decembrists, Don’t You Want to Share the Guilt? by Kate Nash, A Girl, A Boy, and a Graveyard by Jeremy Messersmith, Lies by the Swell Season, Machine by Regina Spektor, One More Time with Feeling by Regina Spektor, and the Boxer by Simon and Garfunkel. I try to find songs with lyrics that mirror elements of the story, and all of these do.

What are you working on now?

I have another book coming out with Katherine Tegen/HarperCollins, so I’m hard at work on that! It is unrelated to TMT–but it is another standalone historical fantasy (or industrial fantasy, if you prefer, because there is lots of metal. Or historical fanfiction, which is what I’m starting to call my work). It’s set in 1893 Chicago and is about a bisexual boy with a metal-based superpower. I’m also working on a manuscript set during the Dutch tulip mania in 1637, about first love and gender identity.

What are your favourite books? (= Any books you’d recommend?)


For great historical fiction, Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein (also happens to be my favorite book).

For steampunk, Leviathan by Scott Westerfeld.

For Frankenstein, This Dark Endeavour and Such Wicked Intent by Kenneth Oppel.

For Mary Shelley, The Lady and Her Monsters by Roseanne Montillo.

And some current favorites that have nothing to do with TMT: Zeroboxer by Fonda Lee, The Weight of Feathers by Anna-Marie McLemore, Bones & All by Camille DeAngelis, The Game of Love and Death by Martha Brockenbrough, Conviction by Kelly Loy Gilbert, Virginia Wolf by Kyo Maclear, and Drift & Dagger by Kendall Kulper.

Thanks for the interview, Mackenzi!

Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell

Hello gentle reader,

if you’ve been following this blog for a while, you may know I love Historical Fantasy, a genre I both read and write. The first book that I loved in this genre is JONATHAN STRANGE AND MR NORRELL by Susanna Clarke, which was published in 2004.


I was therefore utterly delighted when I found out the BBC was adapting the book into a mini-series. So far two episodes have aired in the UK, and it’s set to premiere in the US in June.

My expectations were understandably quite high before watching the first episode, but I’m happy to report I wasn’t disappointed in the slightest. This is a great example of a TV show that lives up to the standards of plot and setting set by the book it’s based on.

Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell

JONATHAN STRANGE AND MR NORRELL is set in an alternate England during the Napoleonic Wars. Although magic is widely believed in, no magician has been able to cast a spell since the Raven King is said to have left the country. Magical studies have become theoretical, until Mr Norrell (played by Eddie Marsan) comes along: a recluse gentleman living in Yorkshire, he becomes the first magician to perform magic in 300 years. Suddenly famous, he moves to London in order to help in the war against France. Meanwhile, another gentleman named Jonathan Strange (played by Bertie Carvel), fortuitously discovers he can cast spells as well. He then proceeds to meet Mr Norrell, and asks him to become his apprentice.

Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell 2

All sorts of shenanigans ensue, involving a mysterious Gentleman with the Thistle-Down Hair, fairies, dreamlike-balls, crows, odd hats, and the Duke of Wellington.

Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell 5

Clarke’s book is long (almost 800 pages!) and extremely rich and complex. Turning it into a mini-series can’t have been an easy task, yet the BBC manages it superbly. The settings are gorgeous, the cast spot-on, the plot shortened yet never simplified.


It’s magical, dark and creepy, but also funny and delightful. I recommend it!

Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell 4

And if you need further convincing, here is the trailer:

Have you read Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell? Have you watched the BBC mini-series? What did you think?

Feel free to leave me a comment below!


Waiting On Wednesday – 73

Hello gentle reader,

today I’m waiting on DA VINCI’S TIGER by Laura Malone Elliott (expected publication: 10th November 2015 by Katherine Tegen Books). It’s a YA Historical novel set in Renaissance Florence, and it sounds awesome!

Da Vinci's Tiger

From Goodreads:

Young, beautiful, and witty, Ginevra de’ Benci longs to take part in the artistic ferment of Renaissance Florence. But as the daughter of a wealthy family in a society dictated by men, she is trapped in an arranged marriage, expected to limit her creativity to domestic duties. Her poetry reveals her deepest feelings, and she aches to share her work, to meet painters and sculptors mentored by the famed Lorenzo de Medici, and to find love.

When the charismatic Venetian ambassador, Bernardo Bembo, arrives in Florence, he introduces Ginevra to a dazzling circle of patrons, artists, and philosophers—a world of thought and conversation she has yearned for. She is instantly attracted to the handsome newcomer, who admires her mind as well as her beauty. Yet Ginevra remains conflicted about his attentions. Choosing her as his Platonic muse, Bembo commissions a portrait by a young Leonardo da Vinci. Posing for the brilliant painter inspires an intimate connection between them—one Ginevra can only begin to understand. In a rich and enthralling world of exquisite art, elaborate feasts, and exhilarating jousts, she faces many temptations to discover her voice, artistic companionship, and a love that defies categorization. In the end, she and Leonardo are caught up in a dangerous and deadly battle between powerful families.

“Waiting On Wednesday” is a weekly event, hosted by book blogger Breaking The Spine, that spotlights upcoming releases we’re eagerly anticipating.

Have you heard about this book? Is it on your TBR list? What are you waiting on this week?